The UK restaurant market declined an astonishing 53% in 2020 it’s been an undeniably difficult time for the industry.

Restaurant New Technology

We’ve looked to see what trends were prominent over the last 18 months and which will be here to stay…

4 minute read

Posted: 10/10/2021

MEDIA
UK Food Council

Media & News Desk
020 -3393 - 5337

Email:
news@foodcouncil.uk

Contact:
Arno de Bruin



We found that over 50% of 18-44s said they were highly/ extremely likely to use more technology in restaurants in the future post the pandemic. Consumers have become more conscious of reducing the ‘touch points’ when dining within restaurants since the start of the pandemic. Many operators have quickly adapted to this change from simple solutions such as having a QR code menu, taking away need for physical menus. Another form of technology many operators have implemented is having their own app service, which can provide internal efficiency as well as an improved consumer experience when done well.

The biggest inhibitor to technology is education, not surprisingly over 60% of 18 to 34 year olds have used some form of order and pay solutions since lockdown but only 20% of those over the age of 65 have used them. However, one of the greatest benefits to come from a digitalised ordering platform is consumers often spend up-to 15% more per order as opposed to ordering through a waiter/ waitress.

Technology in the restaurant industry was given a massive amount of acceleration from the pandemic and has become standard within so many operators, however the convenience and benefits have been so beneficial that we expect there to far more development and implementation of new technology in the industry.

"Increasingly m0re restaurants will factor customer lifetime value (CLV) into their customer experience programmes to gain more insights on their target markets. CLV uses the average check size per person, number of visits per year and typical party size to estimate the total amount of money a restaurant will receive from a customer over their lifetime".

Since 2019, the percentage of consumers who rely on posts, comments, shares and other online product recommendations from their friends to decide what they want to buy has increased over 38%. This has got the attention of social media platforms and restaurant brands alike, which will continue to make ordering as frictionless as possible in 2022.

The growth of intelligent restaurants will allow brands to provide personalized customer service without needing to hire more employees. As consumers get used to asking their Google Home or Alexa assistants for help with recipes at home and various other tasks, Restaurants will use customer service assistants as both a connective marketing tool and a functional building block that will serve as a personal assistant and gatekeeper between brand and consumer.”

Thanks to chat technology assisted by artificial intelligence, ordering a Domino’s pizza is now as easy as messaging the company on Facebook. AI-influenced chat also improves responsiveness, as brands no longer need to have a full support team to get notified about every single issue.

With the technology available today, customers who use words like “frustrated” or “angry” can theoretically trigger an alert in the chat system that notifies management of an emergency, prompting a response from a live person to increase overall satisfaction scores. 

Customer Data Profiles

Restaurants can use this metric to guide their spending on customer acquisition and operations and combine it with other data to build customer data platforms (CDPs) and unified customer profiles (UCPs).

CDPs integrate customer information from different sources, including POS terminals, CRM systems, online surveys and forms, social media pages, and orders on third party apps, into a central platform. UCPs contain information on customers’ location, mobile devices, website browsing behaviour, loyalty card numbers, and contact information to provide a comprehensive snapshot of an individual customer.

It is predicted that more restaurants will factor customer lifetime value (CLV) into their customer experience programmes to gain more insights on their target markets. CLV uses the average bill size per person, number of visits per year and typical party size to estimate the total amount of money a restaurant will receive from a customer over their lifetime.

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